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first_img Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Canada: Ample discussion needed before same-sex marriage vote, says group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector Columbus, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Press Release Service Rector Collierville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Job Listing Submit a Press Release Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Jobs & Calls This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Tampa, FL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Tags Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Events [Anglican Journal] When the Anglican Church of Canada’s General Synod meets in July to vote on same-sex marriage, ample discussion time must be provided before the vote is taken, the working group on the marriage canon recommended in a March 13 report to Council of General Synod (CoGS).“There were conversations at some point about putting more time afterward,” said the Rev. Karen Egan, one of the group’s members. “But we continue to believe that this motion should be taken seriously…so there continues to be two rounds of conversation of about 90 minutes [before the vote].”Egan spoke in response to suggestions that, given how painful the fallout of the vote to change the laws of the Anglican Church of Canada to allow for same-sex marriage was likely to be whatever the verdict, a significant chunk of time should be set aside after the vote for people to work through the decision.In 2013, General Synod charged CoGS to bring a motion to the 2016 General Synod meeting July 7-12, asking for a change to the marriage canon (church law) to allow for same-sex marriage. As part of this process, CoGS set up a Commission on the Marriage Canon, which released a report, This Holy Estate, in September 2015. Following the release of the report, it was decided that a working group should be established to facilitate conversation around the marriage canon at General Synod 2016.The working group had drafted a series of recommendations and was ready to send them on to CoGS at the end of January. But after a communiqué from a special meeting of the House of Bishops in February reported that a motion to allow same-sex marriage was “not likely” to pass in the Order of Bishops, it  decided to seek more feedback from CoGS.To this end, the working group introduced an outline of the recommendations during an initial report to CoGS on March 10, with the understanding that suggestions made over the course of the meetings would be incorporated into a final draft.“What we have heard you say is that [This Holy Estate] needs to be studied,” said Egan on March 13, noting that the working group had increased the amount of time allotted for discussion of the marriage commission report after hearing the Council’s feedback.Greater sensitivity around Indigenous participation was another issue Egan flagged as requiring special attention.“The Indigenous groups in this conversation need to be consulted about how they want to be a part of it,” she said. “There’s a will, I think, for us to hear Indigenous voices, and that also needs to be measured against the will of our Indigenous brothers and sisters to remain together and speak about that themselves…There needs to be consultation about that.”The working group’s report suggested that while members of General Synod should spend the bulk of their time—two 90-minute sessions—in “neighbourhood groups” comprising two or three mixed table groups of no more than 25 people, both times should be introduced by plenaries giving detailed information on This Holy Estate and various legislative options for dealing with the motion.The working group stressed that the “neighbourhood groups” are meant to be places for “everyone to be heard and everyone’s opinion to be valued,” not fora for debates. It also noted that the groups should be diverse in terms of age and opinion.This was cause for concern for Bishop Larry Robertson, of the diocese of Yukon, who said that delegates from his diocese were uncomfortable about being separated from each other while discussing same-sex marriage, due to a feeling that they were culturally different from other parts of the church.“We do want to be together when that’s discussed,” he said. “With other people, fine, but together.”Egan assured Robertson that efforts would be made to ensure that members of General Synod would not feel ostracized or alone, noting that a need to hear different voices would be “balanced against…a need for the groups themselves to be comfortable.”The working group also recommended that each of the dozen or so groups be led by a facilitator who is not a member of General Synod, suggesting that skilled volunteers from the Toronto area could be recruited and trained for this purpose beforehand. [General Synod is scheduled to meet in Richmond Hill, Ont., which is about 20 km north of downtown Toronto.]To manage the process of overseeing, training and supporting these volunteers, the committee suggested a “professional ‘captain’” be engaged.While the recommendations go into some detail, Egan stressed that they are still only recommendations.“It really is up to [the General Synod planning committee] to use them as they can,” she said. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis By André ForgetPosted Mar 14, 2016 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Same-Sex Marriage Rector Albany, NY Human Sexuality, Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Bath, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Anglican Communion, Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector and Chaplain Eugene, ORlast_img read more


first_img Tags This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab By Gavin DrakePosted Nov 28, 2016 Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Press Release Submit an Event Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Job Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Collierville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Martinsville, VA [Anglican Communion News Service] Members of the Mothers’ Union in Great Britain have delivered a petition to 10 Downing Street – the official residence of the U.K. Prime Minister – calling for changes to child maintenance rules for victims of domestic violence. Current regulations say that unless child maintenance payments are made direct to the parent with responsibility for bringing up the child, a four percent levy is imposed under what is known as the “collect and pay” system. This “could force survivors of domestic abuse to engage with a former partner, the very perpetrator who carried out the abuse against them,” the Mothers’ Union said.Full article. Rector Belleville, IL Gender Justice An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Events Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Press Release Service Advocacy Peace & Justice, Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Mothers’ Union march on Downing Street for victims of domestic violence Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Anglican Communion, Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Bath, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraskalast_img read more


first_img Campaigning and fundraising software company Engaging Networks have announced that all staff from the not-for-profit digital agency Rechord will be joining their team. They will help them develop new fundraising and campaigning software products for small charities and local community groups. The partnership starts on 1 October.Rechord have built and hosted websites primarily for third sector organisations for the past 13 years.In particular the Rechord team will help Engaging Networks with its work adding more user-friendly front-end tools to their back-end java-based applications. Advertisement Engaging Networks and Rechord web design agency to combine Howard Lake | 26 September 2012 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Tagged with: Consulting & Agencies Digitalcenter_img “It’s a great fit,” said Graham Covington, Director of Engaging Networks. “Rachel Collinson, Rechord’s founder, will help us to market the Engaging Networks brand based on her insights and thought leadership”.Engaging Networks’ clients include Greenpeace UK, Peta UK and Humane Society International.www.engagingnetworks.net AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  39 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more


first_imgSRW areas see moisture for the next 10 days limited to a few tenths north of the OH River, but half to 2 inch totals are possible south of the OH River. Temps slowly get back to normal between now and midweek next week and then go below normal to finish the month. Brutal cold comes in over the region for early February, and we look for that cold to stay. Just like we have no real worries for argentina corn…bean areas look pertty good too, after a slow start to the season. However, the latest models may raise a bit of concern over dryness, as today’s look is much drier than we have seen the past few days.  SOYBEAN Weather SHARE Previous articleMorning OutlookNext articleMidday Update Hoosier Ag Today Facebook Twitter That clipper brings a much colder push of air behind it. Models are showing the trough deep enough that it pushes the major system we have been talking about for the 2nd-3rd down south into the gulf coast area. That might be a bit over done…but we will see what subsequent models say. We also continue to monitor a strong system for the 4th, and now some clipper snows for the 7th. A nice little low passes over us on Sunday and looks very similar to what we have been talking about the past few days. Moisture amounts in the .1”-.3” range. The coverage looks good, although we can see it more state wide now rather than northern half. We like most of the precipitation coming at liquid, as the freezing lint at 1 pm Sunday still sits up along the MI line…but there will likely be some wet snowflakes in there as well. Any lingering moisture Sunday night (a few hundredths) will come as light snow and leave minor accumulations.The rest of the week next week should be pretty slow as well. Colder air will be in as high pressure follows the Sunday system. WE look for temps to be at or below normal for the week. Models have some disagreement over the next system, with the European model downplaying the next event somewhat, while the GFS still tries to ramp things up. We will keep a mention of a clipper-like system for late Friday into Saturday (30th-31st). Moisture amounts are not spectacular at this time, but we can see some decent snows, especially over the northern part of the state. Short term moisture in the US Corn Belt will be limited, as a strong front the next couple of days stays well to the south, and a low for this weekend has only a few tenths of moisture potential. Most of next week will be dry as well. Much colder air dives in at the turn of the month. There will be a couple of stronger storms that try and move in to the region out of the plains, but tracks are still very uncertain. Currently models are allowing cold air to dictate the tracks, and therefore have pushed tracks south of the Corn Belt. We think that can change in the days ahead. Cold air is brutal early February (as this map shows) A fairly benign and colder day over the Hoosier state today, although temps still are at or above normal in most locations. We really see nothing major coming for the next couple of days. Temps will slowly work back a few degrees higher, but we likely are done with the super mild air. Most of the reason we are not seeing anything significant here is the fact that a major storm will b passing by to the south. 1” plus rains will move across the Deep South, but will not push north of the mason Dixon line at all, leaving us pretty boring. Weather that Impacts CORN: By Hoosier Ag Today – Jan 22, 2015 WHEAT Weather  Models have taken a similar approach in southern Brazil corn areas as well, knocking moisture back to just scattered showers in the short term, and then putting all the eggs in the basket for the 4th. We will keep a more active approach to our forecast in the short term, with up to 1 inch of rain through midweek next week, and then 1-3 inches from late next week through early February. This is a little lower on overall moisture total than we had been talking, but is a far cry from the shutting of the spigot that the models have tried to do today. We think they are just going too far to fast. FSU wheat areas look colder for the first part and last part of the forecast period. The last 5 days of the period we see well below normal temps. In the middle, we see some milder air lifting up from the south. This will be right about the same time a couple of weaker fronts toy with the area, trying to come in out of Eastern Europe. We can see precipitation totals up to .75” liquid equivalent out of those two systems, coverage at about 60%. We like most of the moisture over the Central and southern Regions, and to a lesser extent in the Volga region. This should be a mix of rain and snow, ending as more snow. We don’t think its any cause for alarm, but the models last night and this morning have gone quite a bit drier for Argentina over the next two weeks. One model suggests there may not be any good frontal driven rains or thunderstorms until we get to the 4th of February. We think this is a bit over done. However, the front for this weekend does look weaker this morning, and we will have to adjust rains to under 1 inch and coverage back to 50% for Argentina corn areas. We will leave the rest of the forecast alone, and still look for some action at midweek next week before the system on the 4th rolls through. Frontal action in the extended period looks less impressive this morning, but the coverage of scattered actiuon over the next two weeks looks more homogenous. So…we feel comfortable lookint for up to 1.5” of rain combined over the next two weeks over 70% of the brazil Soy belt. This probably is best referred to as timely rain. There should be enough room inbetween action to keep harvest rolling along, but there should be enough scattered mosture (even in the east and northeast) to keep stories of dryness in check. It really looks like a decent pattern to finish off beans and start off the 2nd crop corn.  SHARE Good rains in TX and OK this morning (ok, some of the moisture in OK is snow). This comes out of a strong low that is getting ready to exit TX this morning. This is the storm the Weather Channel has decided to name. In any case, this system moves basically straight east…across the Deep South. Southern HRW areas can see up to 1 inch of moisture. Areas from the KS/OK line northward see nothing today. Very little moisture expected next week either. However, toward the end of the week, we see another scenario much like we see playing out today…a strong low in TX moving east. WE think that subsequent model runs will try and take this low more northeast (the way they were a few days ago) which can bring moisture back to the northern half of HRW country…but for now, we should not count on it. Temps get much colder later next week, and stay cold for February. Indiana Weather Forecast 1/22/2015 Home News Feed Indiana Weather Forecast 1/22/2015 Facebook Twitter BEYOND INDIANA:last_img read more


first_imgAdvertisement Andrew CareySign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up [email protected] force winds and heavy rain has hit the west coast and caused localised flooding in large parts of Limerick City and county with roads and access points engulfed in water.With Met Eireann issuing an Orange weather alert for the next 24 hours, flood crews have been working around the clock.Areas of the river Shannon on both Clancy and O’Callaghan Strands have been covered in a deluge of water as the bank breeches give way to the excess flow.In the county, areas most effected were Foynes and Askeaton while the Maigue burst it’s banks in Adare.Response crews from the Councils are dealing with the watery wake of Storm Bridgid and the adverse weather is expected to remain for another 24 hours with high winds and heavy rainfall combining to meet higher tides.Caution is being urged and unnecessary travel should be avoided.Share your weather pictures by sending them to [email protected] Previous articleTeens arrested in suspected Limerick arson attackNext articleUpdated Reader submitted Flood photos Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie TAGSfeaturedfloodingMusic Limerickstormweather RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR No vaccines in Limerick yet Emma Langford shortlisted for RTE Folk Award and playing a LIVE SHOW!!! this Saturday Print Linkedin NewsBreaking newsLimerick awash with flooding as storm hitsBy Staff Reporter – February 1, 2014 929 center_img Facebook Twitter WhatsApp Email Celebrating a ground breaking year in music from Limerick #HearThis: New music and video from Limerick rapper Strange Boy #SaucySoul: Room 58 – ‘Hate To See You Leave’ Walk in Covid testing available in Limerick from Saturday 10th April last_img read more


first_imgMay 9, 2018 /Sports News – Local River Cats Clobber Bees Robert Lovell Tags: Baseball/PCL/Salt Lake Bees FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmail(Sacramento, CA)  —  Casey Kelly tossed eight innings of one-run ball to lead the River Cats past the Bees 7-1 in Sacramento.The lone Salt Lake run was a solo-homer off the bat of Michael Hermosillo in the fourth inning.Ivan Pineyro surrendered seven runs over four frames of relief to take the loss.The Bees fell to 20-and-13 and resume their four-game set in Sacramento today. Written bylast_img


first_imgIt was the “head thing” that seemed like window dressing to Madeline Meehan, the Harvard Innovation Labs operations director who wanted to lose a few pounds.In the end, she says it was the “head thing” that made her a believer.“I thought it was all about the weight, but it’s really not,” Meehan said. “It’s about screwing your head on in a different direction.”Over 16 weeks this past fall, Meehan put herself at the mercy of a Harvard Launch Lab startup, Gain Life, and found the pounds coming off. By the time the program wrapped up in February, she had lost 30 pounds.Not bad results from a casual conversation.Meehan became a Gain Life guinea pig in October while visiting the Harvard Launch Lab, a relatively new, curated, co-working space in Allston for startups founded by Harvard graduates.Meehan was walking past Sean Eldridge, a Harvard Business School graduate and one of Gain Life’s co-founders, when he called Meehan over to ask what she thought of the name PowerUp for the company’s weight-loss program for women.Next thing Meehan knew, she was enrolled in the first PowerUp cohort, engaging digitally with a coach and a group of fellow wannabe weight losers. Over the coming weeks, Meehan changed her diet and exercise habits, but also fought what Eldridge calls “the battle between the ears” — seeking an internal shift that Eldridge says is key in successful weight loss and an important element in Gain Life’s programs.Madeline Meehan discusses the PowerUp program with team members Julia Lennon (left) and Ian Richardson.The casual encounter that led Meehan to Eldridge was accidental, but not entirely by accident. The Launch Lab is designed to encourage interaction between the roughly two dozen startup companies manning 130 desks cheek-by-jowl in two large, adjoining open spaces.Not quite two years old, the Launch Lab is part of a growing culture of entrepreneurship fostered at the Harvard Innovation Lab across the street, which offer space, networking, expert advice from “entrepreneurs in residence,” and other support to student entrepreneurs.The University-wide entrepreneurial nexus is about to grow bigger, with the planned addition of the Life Lab, 15,000 square feet of laboratory space for biomedical or biotech startups, which make up a significant proportion of the startup population, Meehan said.Eldridge and Ian Richardson, who joined Gain Life in September, said the Launch Lab environment is supportive, naturally collegial, and fertile ground for a startup. The “pay-it-forward” ethos means that those starting out can seek advice from those in older companies. Gain Life, for example, can offer experience-based advice in product development and deployment, but will look to others when it comes to securing external funding, a step it has yet to take.“From an outsider’s perspective, the ecosystem that’s been built here is second to none,” said Richardson, a graduate of Furman University in South Carolina. “The idea that you can kind of have these EIRs [entrepreneurs-in-residence], these mentors, help you start something from nothing is not something you see all over the country. This is very much a unique thing.“It has accelerated … my own learning in a way I never thought possible. I didn’t know, seven months in, I would have such a strong grasp of ‘Hey, this is how funding works, this is how product development works, this is how marketing works.’ It’s just an amazing resource.”Gain Life is seeking a foothold in a marketplace crowded with fad diets, diet books, weight-loss programs, and not a few wild claims of success. Eldridge thinks he and co-founder John Peters — a nutrition expert he met while working at Procter & Gamble after leaving HBS — have found something that both sets the company apart and works for most of their clients.Peters’ research into people who had lost a lot of weight and kept it off — an average of 70 pounds for six years — revealed the importance of the mental component, Eldridge said. Though there were practices in common — such as exercising for 150 minutes a week — what was most important was an identity change: They recognized their post-weight-loss selves as different people, and had developed a new mindset about themselves, food, and exercise.Gain Life’s programs, Eldridge said, draw on that work — as well as practices gleaned from cognitive behavioral therapy and self-determination theory — to help people achieve a similar change.“You have to blog every day,” Meehan said of her own experience, “and at first I wasn’t blogging every day because you have to write how you feel. And I thought again, ‘Is this crazy? But I’ll do it because I like these guys.’ I was doing it more to help the startup and then the more I got into it I was like, ‘Wow, this is working.’”The company recently concluded an 18-month research-and-development phase that tested their programs tailored to men and women. The 16-week programs begin with an in-depth consultation with a coach who probes the deeper reasons behind the desire for weight loss, Eldridge said. The answers inform both coach and client and help align the program’s goals to the client’s broader life aims.For example, Eldridge said, a middle-aged man may want to lose 40 pounds and, when asked why, he might say to look better and get back into shape. Asked why he wants to get back into shape, he might reveal that he wants to be alive for his young daughter’s wedding day. When asked why the wedding is important, he might respond that his own father developed diabetes, and, when asked about that, he might reveal that the diabetes began a cascade of health ills and, ultimately, he doesn’t want his own poor health to be a burden on his children.Of those who’ve gone through the programs, 80 to 85 percent complete the course, according to company statistics. After a year, men lost an average of 14 percent of body weight and women 12 percent, both better than the 5 percent Richardson said is considered the industry “gold standard.”The company is looking to expand in the next year and is targeting both the consumer and corporate markets, Eldridge said. He wants the number of clients to grow to 10,000 and expects the 25-person staff — most of whom are coaches who work from various locations — to more than double.That means the company will be embarking on a personnel search, but it doesn’t mean it’s quite ready to leave the friendly confines of the Launch Lab, with its easy access to i-lab resources, professors with whom Eldridge studied as a student, and even the restaurants he visited then.“It definitely makes me feel like I’m more tied to the University … because it’s continuing to give so much to me,” Eldridge said. “We’re in no rush to get out of here.”last_img read more


first_img July 1, 2006 Regular News Civil Legal Assistance Act cleared to go statewide Civil Legal Assistance Act cleared to go statewidecenter_img Jan Pudlow Senior Editor Now that The Florida Bar Foundation has the governor’s blessing, they will take the Florida Access to Civil Legal Assistance Act statewide.As soon as Gov. Jeb Bush approved $2.5 million, the largest appropriation from the state ever, that was the Foundation’s plan. There was excitement to expand the program from the seven-circuit pilot to all 20 circuits. But that excitement was short-lived.Soon thereafter, the statewide goal was put on hold, because of promises made between Rep. Dudley Goodlette, R-Naples, and the governor’s general counsel, Raquel Rodriguez.As Terry Russell, the former 2001-02 Bar president who created the first plan to get state government to pitch in to help poor people with civil legal problems, said: “We want to make sure the Foundation’s credibility and willingness to work with the governor is maintained and protected and preserved.”Goodlette explained the chronology of events:Last year, Bush vetoed the $5 million for the program three weeks after legislators voted for it.“The governor told me at the time that the motivating factor in choosing to veto was he simply was reluctant to expand government,” Goodlette said. “He wanted to gain more comfort with the success of the pilot program before he was prepared to spend more money and make it a larger program.”This year, Goodlette helped achieve the $2.5 million appropriation.“What I learned from the Foundation is with $2.5 million, the program could be expanded,” Goodlette said. “I discussed that with Rocky Rodriguez, and she thought if that were the case, the governor would have an outlook on it similar to last year, that that was growing government.”At that point, Goodlette said, “I assured her that if that was the governor’s view, assuming he would not veto the $2.5 million, it would remain a pilot program in seven circuits.”Five weeks ago, Goodlette said, Rodriguez “indicated to me, based upon her conversations with the governor, that she thought it would be better if it remained a pilot program. She would urge him to sign the bill.”Once Goodlette learned the Foundation did want to go statewide, he got back to Rodriguez and said: “I want to be straight up with you. The Foundation has said they can expand it statewide.”But he wanted to keep his word about keeping it limited to the pilot. The second week of June, Goodlette said, Rodriguez told him she had talked to the governor and he said go ahead and take it statewide if that was important to Goodlette and the Bar.“I couldn’t be more pleased,” Goodlette said.The Foundation anticipates making grants in each of the 20 judical circuits within the next two months, subject to entering into a contract with the Department of Community Affairs. Interested legal aid programs should contact Camille Stawicki, grant coordinator at the Foundation, at 800-541-2195 or [email protected]last_img read more


first_imgDec 14, 2004 (CIDRAP News) – As part of efforts to improve the nation’s long-term supply of influenza vaccine, the federal government is launching a clinical trial to help get a German-made vaccine licensed for regular use in the United States.The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced Dec 7 it would buy 1.2 million doses of the Fluarix vaccine made by GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) Biologicals to help ease the shortage. The vaccine is used in 70 countries, but because it is not licensed in the United States, people will have to sign a form acknowledging possible risks before they receive it.Two days after that announcement, federal officials announced plans to recruit 1,000 healthy adults for a clinical trial of the vaccine at four sites. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) is collaborating with GSK Biologicals, based in Rixensart, Belgium, on the trial.Dr. Pamela McInnes, deputy director of the NIAID’s Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, said the trial was prompted by the US flu vaccine shortage, which arose when contamination problems forced Chiron Corp. to cancel its shipment of 48 million doses in October. “We’re doing whatever we can to secure the vaccine supply for the next season,” McInnes told CIDRAP NewsMcInnes said the NIAID is funding the clinical components of the trial, such as recruiting volunteers and administering the vaccine, while GSK will cover some infrastructure costs and the testing of blood samples to assess the immune response. She said she couldn’t estimate the cost of the trial at this point.The trial will be conducted by four NIAID-supported Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Units, at the University of Rochester Medical Center, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore, and Baylor College of Medicine in Houston.In the NIAID announcement, lead investigator John Treanor, MD, of the University of Rochester, said, “Although the vaccine we are testing has a very long safety record in Europe and other parts of the world, the type of study we are conducting must be done before the vaccine can be licensed for use in the United States.”Four of every five participants in the trial will receive Fluarix, while the fifth will receive a placebo, the NIAID said. Those receiving the placebo will be offered US-licensed vaccine at the end of the month-long study.When HHS announced its plan to buy GSK vaccine last week, the company said it had long-term plans to seek a US license for the product. A Dec 9 Washington Post report quoted the company as saying it intends to sell 10 million to 20 million doses in the United States for next year’s flu season if it gets a license.In other recent flu-vaccine developments, the United Kingdom’s drug regulatory agency said last week it was extending the license suspension for Chiron’s Liverpool vaccine plant for another 3 months. The Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) suspended the plant’s license because of contamination problems Oct 5, forcing cancellation of the company’s vaccine shipments to the United States.”This new suspension does not result from any newly identified safety issues or findings at the Liverpool plant,” the MHRA said. “It is routine regulatory action to give Chiron more time to carry out the extensive and detailed remedial plan which is now being put in place.”The MHRA said it was keeping the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) well informed of developments and would include FDA inspectors on an upcoming visit to check Chiron’s progress in fixing problems at the plant. The FDA has come under fire for not predicting Chiron’s problems and reacting to them sooner.”The suspension can be lifted at any time if Chiron is able to satisfy the MHRA that it has rectified the site’s problems,” the MHRA statement added.Also last week, Chiron announced it had received an FDA warning letter asking for more information about the company’s investigations of problems at the Liverpool plant. The letter, stemming from a remediation plan the company submitted in November, asks for more details about investigations into “current Good manufacturing Practices deviations” and related studies.The FDA gave Chiron 15 working days to respond to the letter, the company said.See also:Dec 9 NIAID news releaselast_img read more


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