Tag: 419论坛正宗吗


first_imgMonday Dec 1, 2014 IRPA Try of the Year 2014 awarded to Francois Hougaard and the Springboks The Springboks’ end of year tour ended poorly but there was some consolation in the announcement that the great try they scored against New Zealand was named the International Rugby Players’ Association (IRPA) Try of the Year 2014.South Africa lost in the northern hemisphere for the first time in three years, but will take heart from a season that ended with a 71% winning rate, as they won 10 out of their 14 matches. They scored 44 tries in total, conceding only 19, which is their best defensive effort in 15 years.One of the highlights of the season was the 27-25 victory over New Zealand, and Francois Hougaard scoring this great length of the field team effort. He becomes the third South African to win the IRPA Try of the Year award, after Jaque Fourie in 2009, and Bryan Habana in 2012.Previous winners:2013 – Beauden Barrett (New Zealand)2012 – Bryan Habana (South Africa) – South Africa v New Zealand2011 – Radike Samo (Australia) – Australia v New Zealand2010 – Chris Ashton (England) – England v Australia2009 – Jaque Fourie (South Africa) – South Africa v British & Irish Lions2008 – Brian O’Driscoll (Ireland) – Australia v IrelandThis year’s panel of judges was made up of Samoa’s Seilala Mapusua, New Zealand great Jeff Wilson, Ireland’s Alan Quinlan and Scotland’s Dan Parks. They chose this effort over the shortlise that included Jamie Roberts, Cornal Hendricks, Magali Harvey and Jonny May.IRPA Executive Director Rob Nichol said that choosing one winner was a difficult process. “With so many great international tries during 2014, involving both individual brilliance and collective effort, it is never an easy process to settle on one try. However, when it came down to it, Hougaard’s try stood out for the judges due to the high level of skills involved by different players and, most importantly, the teamwork required to make it happen.”World Rugby Chairman Bernard Lapasset said that it was truly deserving of the accolade.“I’d like to congratulate Francois Hougaard on winning this award. It was a fantastic try,” he said.It started from deep within the Springboks’ own 22. There was wonderful elusive running, lightning passing, rapid recycling, a deft kick ahead, which was expertly gathered and then a well-timed run from Francois finished it off in style.“It was a real team effort that demonstrated ambition, enterprise and no little skill against the number one side in the world. In short, it was a try that was truly deserving of this accolade. “The competition was very stiff for this award with four other great tries in the running. It was particularly pleasing to see the best try of Women’s Rugby World Cup 2014 being shortlisted. Magali Harvey’s score was a real highlight of that tournament and I’d also like to congratulate Jamie Roberts, Cornal Hendricks and Jonny May for their contributions.”View all the tries on the IRPA Try of the Year 2014 shortlistADVERTISEMENT Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error Great Tries Related Articles 26 WEEKS AGO Incredible athleticism for sensational try… 26 WEEKS AGO ARCHIVE: Suntory score amazing try to upset… 26 WEEKS AGO WATCH: All 12 tries from EPIC Bristol-Clermont… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedUrologists Stunned: Forget the Blue Pill, This “Fixes” Your EDSmart Life ReportsYou Won’t Believe What the World’s Most Beautiful Girl Looks Like TodayNueeyGranny Stuns Doctors by Removing Her Wrinkles with This Inexpensive TipSmart Life ReportsIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier Living10 Types of Women You Should Never MarryNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more


first_img The Elephant Man View Comments Bernard Pomerance’s The Elephant Man revolves around the real-life John Merrick (Cooper), a severely disfigured 19th-century Englishman who struggles to live with dignity. The play premiered on Broadway in 1979 and won three Tony Awards, including Best Play. It was revived in 2002 with Billy Crudup in the lead role. As previously announced, The Elephant Man will also star Patricia Clarkson as Mrs. Kendal, Alessandro Nivola as Dr. Fredrik Treves, Anthony Heald as Ross/Bishop Walsham How, Scott Lowell as Snork/Pinhead Manager/Lord John, Kathryn Meisle as Miss Sandwich/Princess and Henry Stram as Carr Gomm/Conductor. We now know who will be joining Broadway.com Audience Choice Award winner Bradley Cooper in The Elephant Man on the Great White Way. Chris Bannow, Peter Bradbury, Lucas Calhoun, Eric Clem, Amanda Lea Mason, Marguerite Stimpson and Emma Thorne will all appear in the production, which begins previews on November 7. Directed by Scott Ellis, the show will officially open on December 7 at the Booth Theatre and play a limited engagement through February 15.center_img Related Shows The Elephant Man will feature scenic and projection design by Timothy R. Mackabee, costume design by Clint Ramos, lighting design by Philip S. Rosenberg and original music and sound design by John Gromada. Show Closed This production ended its run on Feb. 21, 2015last_img read more


first_imgView image | gettyimages.com View image | gettyimages.com Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The first dead body I ever saw was lying on a funeral pyre in Nepal. It wasn’t a high-caste affair at the Pashupatinath Temple in Kathmandu. There was no tell-tale shroud, so I was surprised when I realized that the oddly shaped stick being licked by the flames was actually an emaciated brown limb. Then I noticed the calloused foot.Now there’s so much death, so much destruction, it’s all you can see. The death toll is rising into the tens of thousands as the international rescue effort struggles to reach the far-flung villages of Nepal. As the days stretch into weeks before help arrives, I hope the living won’t come to envy the dead. I’ve trekked on those steep winding trails, climbing one hill only to descend to a narrow valley, and having to cross swinging rope bridges over raging rivers that would have given Indiana Jones second thoughts.When I spotted the top of a stupa, a Buddhist temple, overlooking a pile of rubble in Kathmandu, I felt some relief to know that some artifacts of the country’s priceless heritage survived the devastation. But so much will be lost forever.Kathmandu had its heyday about 500 years ago, give or take a century or two, when the silk trade between China and India was very lucrative through those Himalayan passes. At one point in the Kathmandu valley there were actually three kingdoms, when the royal family split apart, each son apparently competing with the others to build the most impressive temple complex in Bhaktapur and Patan as well as in the original royal city. Those are the pagoda structures that took the biggest hit from the massive shockwave. An earthquake in 1988 had registered 6.5 on the Richter scale and left hundreds dead and thousands homeless. Saturday’s quake had a magnitude of 7.8. The loss is incalculable.Until 1951, Nepal was known as “the forbidden kingdom,” a Hindu monarchy about the size of Tennessee wedged between India and Tibet, separated on the north by the Himalayas, the highest mountain range in the world culminating with Mount Everest, and on the south by the Terai, tropical lowlands where the Buddha was born in Lumbini more than two millennia ago. The country’s sovereignty was protected by a treaty between Great Britain’s East India Company and Nepal’s aristocracy, who guaranteed a supply of troops in exchange for never becoming a colony like India. It was those fierce soldiers, the Gurkhas, who made a name for themselves fighting alongside the Allies against the Japanese in World War II.When they returned home after the war, they brought a different world view that ultimately led to a unique revolution. Instead of overthrowing the raja—the king—it restored him to power because since the 19th century the ruling family were the Ranas, whose progeny became Nepal’s hereditary prime ministers. The status quo came to an abrupt end in 1950 when King Tribhuvan Bir Bikram Shah managed to escape the Ranas’ guards by allegedly going on a hunting trip with his family but instead seeking asylum in India. Tellingly, the Nepalese regard him as the Father of the Nation because he set the country on the path to a constitutional monarchy. He died in 1955.I arrived in Nepal in time for the 1975 coronation of his 29-year-old grandson, Birendra Bir Bikram Shah Dev, which had been delayed for a few years by the royal astrologers until the signs were most auspicious. Thanks to my college program, I’d taken my junior year abroad to live with a Nepalese family and get academic credit for making a 16 mm film and writing an article for The Rising Nepal Newspaper.That’s how I ended up at the home of Rishikesh Shah, Nepal’s first ambassador to the United Nations. On the walls of his study were photos of him shaking hands with President John F. Kennedy and Premier Nikita Krushchev. But I never met him because he was residing out of the country while writing a book about the monarchy. Instead, my official host was his wife, a friendly, rather rotund woman, who greeted me upstairs in her bedroom, where she was seated in the middle of a large bed surrounded by paperback novels written in Newari, one of Nepal’s dozens of dialects. She was entertaining a stately, elderly gentleman who seemed to be most amused by my purpose in coming to Nepal.What caste, he asked me, did I wish to be considered equal to? Being an uppity 22-year-old, I scoffed at the notion and told him brashly that in America we had no castes; everyone was equal in the pursuit of happiness. He turned to Mrs. Shah and they nodded at each other knowingly. And so I found myself eating my meals and hanging out with her servants. My dinners were their nightly entertainment. Sometimes, I’d eat before 10 people, all crowded into a tidy kitchen at the back of Mrs. Shah’s compound, watching me plow through mounds of rice, hot chili curries and lentils, the sweat dripping off my brow. And whenever I managed to utter something in Nepalese, which I was allegedly learning during the day, they burst into laughter and smiled broadly.One of the highlights of my five months’ stay was seeing the raja and rani perched in their red velvet-canopied throne atop a lumbering decorated elephant as the royal procession left the old palace in Kathmandu’s Durbar Square after the coronation ceremony. Rani, also known as Queen Aiswarya, didn’t look too comfortable riding up in their howdah, no doubt preferring to be in the back seat of Rolls-Royce. But that ride was a breeze compared to the turbulence to come. With the vast majority of the country living in extreme poverty, tourist dollars and foreign aid, even before a major catastrophe like the recent earthquake, never trickled down far enough. A Maoist insurgency sprung up to bedevil the government, claiming thousands of lives as the rebels demanded land reforms, no royal family and no close ties to India.By the 1990s, Raja Birendra had his hands full. But the worst was yet to come. In June 2001, he and seven members of his family were murdered by his own son and heir apparent, Crown Prince Dipendra, in the new palace. Apparently, the raja, regarded as the reincarnation of Lord Vishnu, the Preserver, was no match for the barrage of bullets fired by his 29-year-old son who may have become unhinged because he’d fallen in love with a woman his mother disapproved of—and the astrologers had advised postponing his marriage until he was 35.The Maoist rebels put their guns down in 2006 but the Nepal government has never gained ground, let alone the upper hand. The average annual income is pegged at $700 a year, and that’s generous. One of the highest-paid gigs is also one of the most dangerous, being a Sherpa guide up Mount Everest where the pay might be up to $5,000. When the recent earthquake struck, it triggered a deadly avalanche that leveled the base camp at 18,000 feet above sea level, killing at least 18 people, injuring and stranding dozens more.The same geological force propelling Mount Everest to become the summit of mountaineers’ aspirations—the tectonic collision slamming the Indian and Eurasian plates—has torn the land asunder. It was only a matter of time. View image | gettyimages.com When I visited Bhaktapur, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, a redevelopment team led by West Germans was training a cadre of skilled Nepali carpenters to restore the temples to their original glory. The project also involved installing public sewers, improving the drinking water and building a bus depot for tourists because all cars were going to be banned from the temple square. The old buildings were too fragile, the project coordinator told me back then, 40 years ago, adding that “heavy traffic” would shake them apart.Today these irreplaceable structures lie in ruins.The question now is not about replacing the past, but helping the Nepalese survive the present.Read about local relief efforts and how you can help HERE.last_img read more