Tag: 2020上海龙凤


first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A Hempstead man with a history of seizures has been charged with manslaughter for allegedly ignoring medical advice to not drive before a crash that killed his 27-year-old partner and 4-year-old son two years ago, Nassau County prosecutors said.Renen Vides pleaded not guilty Monday at Nassau County court to charges of second-degree manslaughter, reckless endangerment, reckless driving and driving without a license.“In spite of repeated warnings and repeated seizures, the defendant recklessly drove anyway, risking everyone in his path,” Acting Nassau County District Attorney Madeline Singas said.Prosecutors said the 29-year-old man was driving his Mitsubishi Galant eastbound on Old Country Road when he veered off the road and struck a tree front of the Source Mall in Westbury shortly before noon on Sept. 29, 2013.Two passengers in the car—his common-law wife, Martha Candida Hernandez Majano, and his son, Renen Vides Jr.—died at the scene.The driver wasn’t taking his prescribed seizure medication, was having seizures in the months leading up to the crash and lost consciousness immediately prior to hitting the tree, authorities said.A grand jury indicted Vides on March 30 following a lengthy and investigation. Garden City police officers who pulled him over Friday for driving without a front license plate took him into custody after finding that he had a warrant for his arrest.Judge Philip Grella set bail for Vides at $250,000. If convicted, he faces up to 15 years in prison. He is due back in court Sept. 2.last_img read more


first_imgNZ Herald 9 December 2015A group opposed to euthanasia is encouraging more doctors to sign a new open letter objecting to assisted suicide.But the MP backing a bid to legalise euthanasia says his bill is solid, and claimed the loud objections of some doctors were hypocritical and detached from public opinion.The Care Alliance, which opposes euthanasia, said one its trustees, Dr Sinead Donelly, launched the online letter to send a message to lawmakers.The letter claimed to have attracted the support of 40 doctors by mid-afternoon.“We believe that crossing the line to intentionally assist a person to die would fundamentally weaken the doctor-patient relationship, which is based on trust and respect,” the letter stated.“We are especially concerned with protecting vulnerable people who can feel they have become a burden to others, and we are committed to supporting those who find their own life situations a heavy burden.”The letter invoked the position statements of the World Medical Association and New Zealand Medical Association (NZMA).NZMA chairman Stephen Child said the association was not aware of the letter being published. However, the NZMA’s position statement on euthanasia was recently reviewed and was consistent with the tenor of the open letter.In its position statement, the NZMA opposed euthanasia but supported the concept of “death with dignity and comfort”.“Euthanasia, that is the act of deliberately ending the life of a patient, even at the patient’s request or at the request of close relatives, is unethical.”Yet the NZMA supported the right of patients to decline treatment, or request pain relief. It also supported the right of access to appropriate palliative care.Doctors want no part in assisted suicide     We endorse the views of the World Medical Association and the New Zealand Medical Association that physician assisted suicide and euthanasia are unethical, even if they were made legal. We are committed to the concept of death with dignity and comfort, including the provision of effective pain relief and excellence in palliative care.We uphold the right of patients to decline treatment, as set out in the NZ Code of Health and Disability Services Consumers’ Rights.We know that the proper provision of pain relief, even if it may unintentionally  hasten the death of the patient, is ethical and legal.  Equally the withdrawal or withholding of futile treatment in favour of palliative care is ethical and legal.We believe that crossing the line to intentionally assist a person to die would fundamentally weaken the doctor-patient relationship which is based on trust and respect.We are especially concerned with protecting vulnerable people who can feel they have become a burden to others, and we are committed to supporting those who find their own life situations a heavy burden.Doctors are not necessary in the regulation or practice of assisted suicide.  They are included only to provide a cloak of medical legitimacy.  Leave doctors to focus on saving lives and providing real care to the dying.TO SIGN THIS LETTTER, GO TO http://doctorssayno.nz/ http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11558573last_img read more

Recent Comments