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first_imgForce all politicians to show tax returns The Democrats are clamoring to see President Trump’s tax returns. They’ve tried everything else, and now they want to turn people against him because he avoided paying taxes. I admit that that idea bothers me. However he’s doing what other successful businessmen have done before him. No one enters the business sector with the desire to lose money.As long as we’re delving into the realm of public opinion, I’d like to see the tax returns of all the politicians. The Pelosis, Clintons and Maxine Waterses are all multimillionaires.Bernie Sanders claimed earning a million dollars last year, and I’m sure the Obama’s aren’t far behind. How do people who aren’t millionaires upon entering the political arena leave as millionaires? I don’t recall any campaigns in which they said vote for me, and I’ll get rich. How did they use their office to benefit themselves? Their wealth hasn’t helped me in the least. I thought they wanted to help the public.Political office is akin to winning the lottery. Correct me if I’m wrong but I believe the last president to leave office as an everyday person was Truman.Pete PidgeonScotiaIs this how you make America great again?On this, the 75th anniversary of D-Day, we have a president, supported by millions, who mocks American POWs, denigrates Gold Star families and thinks there are good neo-Nazis. MAGAMichael BoehmSchenectadyDo the right thing for St. Clare’s retireesConcerning the St. Clare’s Hospital employee pension fund fiasco: Did the corporation inform the employees that no deposits were being made into their fund so that they could explore options early on? Also, before New York state gave its $25 million-plus, did a licensed actuary determine the required amount necessary to maintain the pension fund? If so, did a financial manager competently manipulate the fund all those years?Apparently not, not, and not. There are many to blame for the disgraceful disregard and abandonment of the St. Clare’s employees. It is past time for each entity to do the right thing.Marilyn B. GuidarelliSchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidation Categories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionBill adds protections against harassment  This legislative session, New York has an opportunity to ensure that the right to equal employment opportunity is available to all employees, across all protected categories, including race, disability, and sexual orientation and that the right is actually enforceable in practice, not just on paper.S3817A/A7083A, sponsored by Senator Biaggi and Assemblywoman Simotas, will allow all employees access to justice by awarding prevailing plaintiffs in employment discrimination cases attorney fees, not just in sex discrimination cases which is current New York state law.Currently, employees must prove that harassing conduct was sufficiently “severe or pervasive” to permeate the workplace.Time after time courts have dismissed claims that allege outrageous behavior including touching of intimate body parts or use of highly offensive language on the basis that the conduct was not severe enough or that it did not happen enough to be considered pervasive.S3817A/A7083A proposes a different minimum threshold, where harassing conduct is unlawful unless the employer proves the complained conduct was a petty slight or trivial inconvenience. This is currently the standard only within New York City, not under state law.Punitive damages are also included in this bill as a form of damages in employment discrimination cases to deter employers from permitting egregious or persistent harassment. This is currently not available under state law.It’s time that employees throughout New York be extended the same protections.Sarah J. Burger, Esq. Saratoga SpringsThe writer is an employment attorney with Burger Law Group PLLC and Second Vice President of the National Employment Lawyers Association/NY Chapter.last_img read more


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first_imgDespite the economy showing no signs of a rebound, foreign investors bought a total of Rp 238.11 billion in Indonesian shares during the day, especially in the negotiations and cash market. This indicated that the selling spree was led by domestic investors.Most buyers pursued stocks with good fundamentals such as gold miner PT Merdeka Copper Gold (MDKA), diversified conglomerate PT Astra International (ASII) and petrochemical giant PT Barito Pacific (BRPT) during the day.The plummeting index on Monday was primarily caused by a decline in blue-chip stocks as many fell by 7 percent, hitting the auto-rejection cap imposed by the bourse. Among them were consumer goods giant PT Unilever Indonesia (UNVR), which plunged by 7 percent, cigarette maker PT HM Sampoerna (HMSP), which declined by 6.95 percent, and state-owned lender PT Bank Negara Indonesia (BBNI), which was down by 6.92 percent.Jasa Utama Capital equity analyst Chris Apriliony told The Jakarta Post on Monday that the IDX’s new auto-rejection rule was quite effective at preventing the JCI from plunging deeper amid the COVID-19 panic sweeping the market.“The declines in share prices these days have not been based on well-determined actions but rather from a panic from investors, so the new auto-rejection rule can help reduce the effect on the JCI,” he said.Last week, the bourse issued a new regulation that limited share price decline to 7 percent for all price ranges from the previous 10 percent.Despite the crash, there were still 69 stocks that managed to make gains. Newly listed property developer PT Makmur Berkah Amanda (AMAN) rose 34.46 percent during the day, and energy services provider PT Apexindo Pratama Duta (APEX) grew 28.57 percent. Pharmaceutical firm PT Pyridam Farma (PYFA) was up 25.33 percent. Topics : Indonesia’s domestic stock benchmark, the Jakarta Composite Index (JCI), languished firmly in the red on Monday, falling by 4.4 percent as the global market rout continued, with COVID-19 fatalities now higher outside China, where the virus is believed to have originated, than inside it.The JCI concluded its trading on Monday at 4,690.06, a level unseen since January 2016. The Indonesia Stock Exchange’s (IDX) main gauge has fallen 25.54 percent so far this year, making for a stubborn bear market, defined by a 20 percent slump from a recent high. Trading on the IDX was halted twice last week after circuit-breaking dives of 5 percent on both Thursday and Friday.The JCI’s slump on Monday followed other Asian markets. The steepest decline was endured by Singapore, which slipped 5.25 percent in a day, while Hong Kong fell by 4.03 percent and Shanghai shrank by 3.4 percent. Tokyo slumped by 2.46 percent.last_img read more


first_imgDespite declaring an emergency status over the COVID-19 pandemic, Jakarta Governor Anies Baswedan needs to step up his game to seriously contain the spread of the disease over concerns that the public may not follow the instructions issued by his office, experts are saying.Anies declared a state of emergency over the increasing numbers of COVID-19 patients in Jakarta on Friday. He urged everyone – including corporations, social organizations and religious groups – to take drastic action to prevent the spread of the disease during the state of emergency.Starting Monday, the city administration is closing all entertainment venues and offices for the next 14 days, calling for companies to arrange for their employees to work remotely. According to the gubernatorial decree he signed on Friday, the status could be extended depending on the situation. Trubus Rahadiansyah, the head of the Center of Public Policy Studies at Trisakti University, said that while he commended Anies for taking strict measures to halt the spread of the virus, he suggested that consequences or sanctions must also be imposed on residents and business entities failing to comply with the orders.“As long as there’s no sanction, or any consequence, for not obeying the administration’s orders, the policy will be useless,” he said on Saturday.He cited examples of instructions issued by Anies and President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo last week that called for residents to stay at home, but which led to crowds on public transportation as people still went to work.Trubus said the emergency status might resemble a soft lockdown since those orders corresponded to the “large-scale social restriction measures” as stipulated by Article 59 of the 2018 Health Quarantine Law. However, he said he failed to comprehend whether it could legitimately be called a soft lockdown since the government had not issued any derivative regulations from the law to define the “lockdown” itself.“Whether it was called a semi-lockdown or a soft lockdown, I think we can agree that the administration is currently imposing large-scale social restriction measures,” Trubus said.Trubus also said that residents and businesses would have a high chance of violating the orders since the administration had not allowed them to prepare for the instructions since everything was announced suddenly.The lower-level administrations, such as community units and neighborhood units, probably had not yet come to grips with the situation and properly disseminated information to their residents.Read also: COVID-19: Anies urges Jakartans to avoid traveling outside the city for three weeksA London-based business consulting group, the Economist Intelligence Unit, said in a recent report that aggressive containment policies in countries like Indonesia and the Philippines may have less effect than in some other countries. The group said that many families in the two countries often live together with older relatives. Moreover, millions of people in insecure work arrangements could also face a loss of income, which would force younger members of households to continue to go out to work, the group added.Bhima Yudhistira Adhinegara, an economist at the Institute for Development of Economics and Finance, echoed Trubus, saying that businesses in Jakarta would probably still require their employees to go to their offices while entertainment places would still operate because of the lack of preparation by the administration before announcing the orders.He said the instructions would burden businesses, especially entertainment places, since they would receive fewer profits during the emergency, while at the same time they were also required to pay recurring operating expenses, such as employee salaries, regional taxes and utility costs.“The administration was supposed to address those issues before announcing the policy. If businesses can’t handle their expenses, they might open their businesses again amid the emergency period,” he said.Bhima urged the administration to swiftly provide compensation so that businesses would comply with the instructions.For example, all businesses could be released from paying regional taxes for a certain period. The administration, he added, could also help them negotiate with banks to postpone the installment periods of their business loans, along with the interest. (glh)Topics : Jakarta has become the hardest hit province with nearly 70 percent of fatalities.Indonesia recorded 450 confirmed cases with 38 fatalities as of Saturday afternoon.The decision followed previous measures taken by the administration issued on March 13 when Anies announced that the city would close 14 tourist spots, schools and suspend the weekly Car Free Day.Read also: BREAKING: Jakarta declares COVID-19 emergency, urges offices to suspend operation for 14 dayslast_img read more